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#MWC E2.12

Jeff shares the song “Storm Chaser” and talks about some personal takeaways from his journey of reading through the Bible on this week’s #MidweekWorshipConnection.

I think we have a pretty great song for you today. It is a song called “Storm Chaser” that I actually wrote several years ago when a good friend of mine was going through a difficult time. He was actually going through a divorce. His wife was leaving him, and it was just very difficult to walk through that, and to see him walk through that. I just remember thinking, “If there is anybody who could calm the storm in his life, it’s Jesus!” That’s really where this song comes from. This is a song that has really ministered to me, a lot, even ever since that time.

Storm Chaser (written by Jeff Polen)

Storm Chaser, the clouds are rolling in
And I need You to rise up and save me
Because only You can speak
To the wind and the waves
That are crashing over me
And rolling inside of me

Can You calm the storm in my soul?
Can You speak the words and send the clouds away?
Can You calm this storm in my soul?
Can You make me new again?
Can You make me new again?

Sin Eraser, I’m broken on my knees
And I need You to come down here and save me
Because only You can take
This mess that I have made
And with Your Father’s heart
Give me a brand new start

Can You calm the storm in my soul?
Can You speak the words and send the clouds away?
Can You calm this storm in my soul?
Can You make me new again?
Can You make me new again?

Only You can take
This mess that I have made
And with Your Father’s heart
Give me a brand new start

Can You calm this storm in my soul?
Can You speak the words and send the clouds away?
Won’t You calm this storm in my soul
Won’t You speak the words and send the clouds away?
You can calm this storm in my soul
Won’t You make me new again?
Jesus, make me new again?

* * *

They assembled themselves together against Moses and against Aaron and said to them, “You have gone too far! For all in the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the LORD is among them. Why then do you exalt yourselves above the assembly of the LORD?” (Numbers 16:3, ESV)

Wow! How painful it must have been for Moses to be leading the Israelites through the wilderness in the many years between the exodus and their actual entrance into the Promised Land.

Moses never asked for a leadership position. He was chosen (see Exodus 3). He was faithfully and simply tending the flock of his father-in-law when he stumbled upon a bush that was on fire but did not burn up. Of course, this was the LORD’s doing. God spoke to Moses in that moment, in the wilderness near the mountain of Horeb, and the LORD chose Moses to be the leader of the Israelites. He would be the human instrument to speak on behalf of God. That’s quite a promotion! But Moses was not actively trying to climb the ladder of leadership. In fact, he actually tried to talk God out of this idea.

But he said, “Oh, my Lord, please send someone else.” (Exodus 4:13, ESV)

This, by the way, is not the suggested way to secular success.

Of course, Moses has been chosen, and he was ultimately empowered by God to do the task that the LORD had set before him. With the obvious help of God, Moses successfully led the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt.
It was all smooth sailing from there, right!? No. Very much no.

The people of Israel were constantly complaining, grumbling, and rebelling against Moses (and ultimately against God). While Moses was on the mountain meeting with God to receive the Ten Commandments, the people were down below making idols and forsaking the true God who brought them up out of the land of Egypt.

They complained about Moses’ leadership over and over. They complained about the food that they had miraculously been given to eat each day. They conspired to rebel against Moses and return to Egypt. On several occasions, God was so upset with the people of Israel that he threatened to kill them all and start over with Moses. Personally, I wouldn’t have blamed Moses for saying, “Great idea, LORD!” But that is not what he did. Instead, he interceded on behalf of the ungrateful, rebellious Israelites (see Exodus 32 and Numbers 14).

At one point, Moses received instruction from the LORD to gather elders of the people together to aid Moses in leading the people (see Numbers 11). The LORD gave some of the spirit he had put on Moses to the seventy elders, and they began to prophecy. A young (unnamed man) and Joshua became afraid that Moses might be offended or threatened by this. When they saw people (other than Moses) prophesying, they ran to Moses to let him know so he could put a stop to it, but Moses had no desire to put a stop to it. He loved it!

But Moses replied, “Are you jealous for my sake? I wish that all the LORD’s people were prophets and that the Lord would put his Spirit on them!” (Numbers 11:29, NIV)

He sounds like a power-hungry, egocentric maniac, doesn’t he?!

No, I didn’t think so, either.

Still, only five chapters later (and only four chapters after his own brother and sister, Miriam and Aaron, publicly oppose Moses), Korah, Dathan, and On, along with 250 prominent members of the congregation gathered together against Moses.

They assembled themselves together against Moses and against Aaron and said to them, “You have gone too far! For all in the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the LORD is among them. Why then do you exalt yourselves above the assembly of the LORD?” (Numbers 16:3, ESV)

How does this happen?

How does a man who never asked to be the leader, who was clearly chosen by God, who faithfully pleaded to God to spare the people he was leading, who wished that “all the LORD’s people were prophets”, and more… how does a man like this receive such a hurtful, untrue, public accusation from the very people he was pouring his life out for?

I don’t know HOW it happens, but I know that it does.

What was his response?

When Moses heard it, he fell on his face. (Numbers 16:4, ESV)

He did not defend himself. He simply fell on his face. He knew that the accusations were not true, but in “winning” the argument, he was going to lose the battle. In trying to vindicate himself, he would, in fact, look like the power-hungry, egocentric maniac that they were wrongfully declaring him to be.

Instead, he turned to God. He turned to the one who chose him to lead, and who had led him thus far. And the LORD vindicated Moses.

I am immensely encouraged by this story. How about you? Are you going through something difficult right now? If not now, likely soon. If you are faithfully serving people and leading in any capacity (even, or maybe especially, leading through parenting), at some point the ones whom you have poured your life out for will turn against you. It is a painful reality. If there is any truth to the accusations, then we have an opportunity to repent and to grow. If there is no truth to the accusations, then we, like Moses, have an opportunity to fall on our faces and simply turn to God for our vindication.

Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you. (1 Peter 5:6–7, ESV)

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#MWC (Season 2)

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